Acclaimed UK Banjo Player, Dan Walsh Stops by the KHSU Magazine

Acclaimed clawhammer banjo player, Dan Walsh came by the KHSU studio during his UK, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand tour in support of his fourth solo album Verging on the Perpendicular .

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Kansas Campuses Prepare For Guns In Classrooms

Mar 22, 2016

Next summer, in addition to textbooks, laptops and double-strength coffee, Kansas college students will be able to bring something else to class: guns.

By July 2017, all six state universities plus dozens of community colleges and technical schools must allow students to carry concealed weapons on campus.

The reason for the change was simple: to make schools safer.

Editor's note: In the wake of terrorist attacks around the world, many Muslims feel called upon to publicly defend their faith, a faith many say is not accurately reflected in the stated or assumed motivations behind such attacks. Writer Beenish Ahmed has struggled with this responsibility all her life and shared her thoughts in this essay published by Code Switch as news was unfolding of the attacks in Brussels.

So you walk into the new Korean joint around the corner and discover that (gasp) the head chef is a white guy from Des Moines. What's your gut reaction? Do you want to walk out? Why?

The question of who gets to cook other people's food can be squishy — just like the question of who gets to tell other people's stories. (See: the whole controversy over the casting of the new Nina Simone biopic.)

Damián Campos

  Andrés Thomas Conteris, founder of Democracy Now! En Español talks about the role of independent media in Honduras where his friend, environmental and indigenous rights activist Berta Cáceres, was recently assassinated.

In English and Spanish, this conversation with Damián Campos questions the role of a Presidential candidate in the 2009 Honduras coup.

Deric Mendes

Amy and Steve Bohner of Alchemy Distillery open up about how and why their construction agency is getting into the booze business. They spoke with Jennifer Bell on Food for Thought

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From NPR

Portland Public Schools' departing board chairman Tom Koehler is injecting new blood into the next stage of the search for a superintendent.

Koehler named five members of a new search task force, the majority of them board members who were just elected last week. New member Julia Brim-Edwards served on the board more than a decade ago, when it hired a previous superintendent, and Koehler has indicated she'll chair the new task force. Scott Bailey and Rita Moore also won election last week, and they'll both serve on the task force.

Conflicts across the Middle East and North Africa are putting over 24 million children at risk, according to alarming new research by the UN Children's Fund.

"Beyond the bombs, bullets and explosions, countless children are dying in silence from diseases that could easily be prevented and treated," says Geert Cappelaere, UNICEF Regional Director for the Middle East and North Africa.

His staff put together some staggering statistics.

Whales are the largest animals on the planet, but they haven't always been giants. Fossil records show that ancient whales were much smaller than the currently living behemoths.

So when did whales get so big, and how?

A new study suggests it might be due to changes in climate that affected the food that some whales eat: krill and small fish. Instead of being spread throughout the ocean, lots of krill started being packed into a small area. Bigger whales were simply more efficient at eating the dense pockets of krill, and they beat out their smaller cousins.

Oregon lawmakers got their first look Tuesday at a bill to overhaul the way the state taxes corporations.

The short version of the plan: Businesses would be taxed on the sales they have in Oregon each year, instead of on their profits.

The 111-page document leaves out some of the details — including how much corporations would actually be taxed under the plan.

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