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Women's March Takes on Year Two

For a second year in a row, the Women's March in Eureka dominated the streets of Old Town this weekend as thousands showed up to the C Street Market Square with signs, pink hats, and resilience. In what was known last year in 2017 as the largest march in Humboldt County, this year's event had similar numbers this year with approximately four to 5,000 people participating. Event organizer Rae Robison said this year the march was about bringing women of all walks of life together and supporting...

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North Korea watchers haven't been getting much sleep this year.

The Kim Jong Un regime started the year with a literal bang — a nuclear test on Jan. 7, marking its fourth such test in the past decade. That was followed by a rocket launch in February, and claims that it had a miniaturized nuclear warhead.

A day after terrorist attacks in Brussels claimed by ISIS killed at least 31 people and wounded at least 270 others, police continue to search for a suspected accomplice.

The man in question, wearing a hat and light-colored jacket, was seen with two suspected suicide bombers on closed-circuit TV at the Brussels airport Tuesday morning, shortly before two explosions went off at the airport and one bomb was set off at a metro station.

The video, taken at Spring Valley High School in Columbia, S.C., went viral last fall: A school safety officer flips a desk to the floor with a girl seated in it, then flings her across the floor. The student is African-American; the officer is white.

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And we're going to hear now from someone who has spent a good bit of his career trying to combat terrorism. It's Juan Zarate. He was deputy national security adviser for combating terrorism under President George W. Bush. Good morning to you.

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Voters supporting Donald Trump and other candidates turned out in huge numbers yesterday in Arizona, Utah and Idaho, where one line into a caucus site was reportedly longer than a mile. NPR's Nathan Rott waited it out with Arizona voters last night.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, after some delay, has named a few of his foreign policy advisers. One says he hopes that if Trump is elected, cooler heads will persuade him not to carry through on some of his promises.

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Now, the Brussels attacks came on a voting day here in the United States. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson is covering the primary and caucus voting in Arizona, Utah and Idaho. Hi, Mara.

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Portland Police Chief Danielle Outlaw celebrated her swearing in Monday with a ceremony at the Oregon Historical Society.

Outlaw is the the first African American woman to lead the police bureau, and has been chief for a little more than three months. 

She spoke for about 20 minutes to a crowd that included African-American leaders, police chiefs and top justice officials from across Oregon. 

Outlaw used her first major public address since taking the helm of the bureau to deliver a wide-ranging, funny and at times deeply personal speech.

Pledging to defend American businesses and workers, President Trump imposed tariffs on imported solar panel components and large residential washing machines on Monday.

Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

A top editor at the New York Daily News has been accused of sexual harassment and is now under investigation by the paper's parent company after inquiries by NPR.

Managing Editor Robert Moore has been accused of creating a sexualized atmosphere, pressuring women for attention and punishing those who objected. Tronc would not say whether he remains on the job or has been suspended or placed on leave.

Fighting miscommunication might seem an ironic choice for an actor whose comedy career was built on all the funny consequences of people misunderstanding each other.

But Alan Alda has made it his mission to help scientists — and the rest of us — communicate better.

It all started when he was hosting the PBS interview program Scientific American Frontiers. He pushed himself, and the scientists he interviewed, to have conversations — to really listen to each other, to connect with each other, and to try to understand one another's perspective.

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