How Can We Make the Redwoods More Inclusive?

Mar 8, 2018
Ruby Rodriguez / Latino Outdoors

Close your eyes and think of an "environmentalist." What do you see? If its an old white guy (probably with a beard and a walking stick), you are not alone! Environmentalism has a diversity problem. It's not that people of color don't care about the environment—polls show that they do, and at levels that surpass white people—but the environmental movement has not made space for their inclusion.

Dr. Alexandra Service and Susan O'Hara's book, The Mills of Humboldt County 1910 - 1945, reveals the transition from the "red gold" rush through the depression and two world wars and the Timber Strike of 1935.

 “Who Bombed Judy Bari?” directed and edited by Mary Liz Thomson and produced by Darryl Cherney covers the story of a particularly violent event that occurred on May 24, 1990 in Oakland, CA, in which a bomb exploded under the driver’s seat of the car which Bari was driving and in which Cherney was a passenger.

Darren Speece, author of "Defending Giants," talks about his new book on the Redwood Wars with the director of EPIC, Environmental Protection Information Center.

Looking at the Redwood Wars, Speece offers lessons for the current environmental movement.

Winter storms have been eroding coastal bluffs at California's Redwood National Park, and as the cliffs disappear, the buried remains of Native American archaeological sites are at risk for falling into the ocean.

One such site is called Summer Place, says Suntayea Steinruck, a member of the Tolowa Dee-ni' Nation and a tribal heritage preservation officer. Her ancestors hunted and fished around what used to be a small village there.