Regional Interests

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

As the investigation into Russian influence in the 2016 election now carries on into 2018, special counsel Robert Mueller is keeping quiet on details.

But one thing does seem clear: A year after President Trump took office, the crime of foreign money laundering has become an important focus of the investigation.

Or, as Stephen K. Bannon purportedly told Michael Wolff in his bestselling book, Fire and Fury, "You realize where this is going... This is all about money laundering."

Here's what is known:

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On this week's Charlando, Yojana, Xochitl and Brenda discuss nuances of culture through food and clothing  and women taking a stand against harassment.

Movimientos Sociales:

Comer Bien:


Everybody needs oil. Saudi Arabia has a lot of oil. So the country has had an endless supply of money.

Then, things started changing. The U.S. started producing more oil, which means Saudi Arabia can't control world oil prices like they used to. Also, it's become clear that the world isn't going to run on oil forever.

Now, a young crown prince is trying to figure out how to save his country before the money runs out. Part of the plan: A Greek, new-age keyboardist.

On the first day as head of the United Nations — January 1, 2017 — Antonio Guterres pledged to make 2017 a year of peace.

But the year didn't turn out as he expected. In an informal address to member states at the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday, Guterres said "peace remains elusive" — and "in fundamental ways, the world has gone in reverse."

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Some TV genres are perennials. They've been around since the early days of television, and probably are never going away — weekly drama series featuring doctors or cops, for example.

Other TV genres are like locusts. They get buried, lying dormant, until they suddenly resurface. On prime time TV, the game show was dead for decades until Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? brought it back. And quite recently, Netflix's Godless, like HBO's Deadwood years before it, did its best to try and revive the TV Western.

Over the span of three weeks in 2015, more than 200,000 saiga antelope suddenly died in central Kazakhstan.

Scientists knew that bacteria called Pasteurella multocida type B caused the mass death. Now, new research suggests that the bacteria was already present in the animals; it was triggered and became harmful because of a period of unusual weather.

Richard Kock, a professor of Wildlife Health and Emerging Diseases at The Royal Veterinary College, witnessed the "rapidly accelerating death."

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