Regional Interests

What Your State Is Doing To Beef Up Civics Education

10 minutes ago

Fake news. Record-low voting turnout. Frequent and false claims from elected officials. Vitriol in many corners of political debate.

These are symptoms we hear of all the time that our democracy is not so healthy.

And those factors might be why many states are turning to the traditional — and obvious — place where people learn how government is supposed to work: schools. More than half of the states in their last legislative sessions — 27 to be exact — have considered bills or other proposals to expand the teaching of civics.

If you've been to a beach this summer, anywhere from Texas to the Carolinas, you've likely seen it. Masses of brown seaweed, sometimes a few clumps, often big mounds, line the shore. It's sargassum, a floating weed that's clogging bays and piling up on beaches in the Gulf and Caribbean.

On Miami Beach recently, Mike Berrier was enjoying the sun and the water, despite the sargassum weed.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

Growing up Washington, D.C.'s Columbia Heights neighborhood, Rebecca Lemos-Otero says her first experience with nature came in her late teens when her mother started a community garden.

"I was really surprised and quickly fell in love," she recalls. The garden was peaceful, and a "respite" from the neighborhood, which had high crime rates, abandoned lots and buildings, she says.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

A South Korean court on Friday tacked on another eight years to former President Park Geun-hye's sentence for illegally receiving funds from a state agency and breaking election laws.

More than 100 former student athletes have reported "firsthand accounts of sexual misconduct" committed by Ohio State University physician Richard Strauss nearly two decades ago, the school announced on Friday.

Officials said the allegations date from 1979 to 1997. They include students who, at the time, were varsity players in 14 sports and patients of Student Health Services.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

July KHSU CAB Meeting

11 hours ago

The public is invited to attend KHSU's Community Advisory Board (CAB) meeting Wednesday, June 27, 2018 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in Behavioral and Social Sciences (BSS) 166 (see map below), on the campus of Humboldt State University. 

In the midst of an investigation into sexual misconduct in the Salem statehouse, Sen. Sara Gelser learned two law students had reported being the target of harassment.

She panicked that the man accused of unwanted touching — Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg — was still in the building and in contact with one of the young interns who had reported his harassment.

That can't happen, Gelser told a task force charged with creating recommendations for the rules governing harassment in the Oregon Legislature.

In May, Lourdes walked across the bridge from Mexico to El Paso, Texas, and requested asylum. The first step is an interview with an asylum officer.

"I told him that I have the evidence on me," Lourdes said, through an interpreter. She told the asylum officer about the scar on her arm, and the four missing fingers on her left hand — all evidence, she says, of a brutal attack by a gang in her native Honduras.

But the asylum officer rejected her claim.

"I don't know what happened," Lourdes said. "I don't know how I failed."

The Clark County Sheriff’s Office has fired a deputy who wore a sweatshirt that promotes a far-right group whose members have espoused racist, Islamophobic and sexist rhetoric.

Deputy Erin Willey was initially placed on leave and then fired after the Columbian newspaper anonymously received a photo of her wearing a Proud Boys shirt. The newspaper shared the photo with Sheriff Clark Atkins, who investigated the photograph and Willey’s relationship to the group.

No issue has plagued Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler like homelessness.

Now, a new analysis of police arrests has both activists and the city’s police union lobbing fresh criticism at the mayor.

In this week’s "OPB Politics Now" podcast, OPB reporters Dirk VanderHart and Amelia Templeton join the Oregonian/OregonLive's Gordon Friedman to explain the outcry, and try to figure out what it means for Wheeler’s political future.

Amy Powell's five-year run as head of Paramount Studios' television division came to a halt on Thursday.

She was suddenly ousted after an internal investigation of her alleged use of racially charged language, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Paramount CEO Jim Gianopulos announced Powell's dismissal in a memo to staff.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Three years ago, the Democratic Socialists of America had about 6,000 members across the country--fewer than the American Racing Pigeon Union.

Since then, DSA membership has shot up more than 600 percent. And Democratic Socialist candidates are popping up across the country. One of them, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is likely to land a seat in the House of Representatives this fall.

Immigration lawyers say nearly two dozen of the 123 immigrant detainees being held at a federal correctional facility in Sheridan, Oregon, have passed what are known as credible fear interviews, which help determine whether an immigrant may be eligible for asylum.

Asylum officers will now refer those detainees' cases to an immigration judge for a full hearing on whether or not they should be released from detention in Sheridan.

The Market For Air

13 hours ago

Jake Dell is the 5th generation owner of Katz's Delicatessen — America's oldest Jewish deli. A few years ago Jake had a problem. The neighborhood was changing, his overhead and his property taxes were skyrocketing, and he started to wonder, can a family-owned deli survive in one of the world's most expensive cities?

And then he realized he had something he could sell, something worth more than sandwiches and coleslaw, something that had been right under his nose the whole time... or rather right above his head.

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