TSUNAMI

NOAA

The next earthquake is likely to happen when you least expect it. Relatively infrequent events are hard to plan for.  Geologist Lori Dengler advises making preparedness a high priority. Make a habit of checking up on your supplies of water, food, batteries and medical supplies.


www.sf.us.emb-japan.go.jp

Following the devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami in northeast Japan, a small boat belonging to Takata High School in Rikuzentakata was swept out to sea. It reached the shores of Crescent City two years later. Del Norte High School students cleaned the boat and returned it to Takata High School. That was the start of a relationship between the two schools - and ultimately the two cities. Crescent City and Rikuzentakata have now formally established a sister city relationship. 


NOAA

How will we know a tsunami may be coming?

Other than feeling the ground shake, we rely on tsunami warning centers to alert us about potential risk.  Dr. Lori Dengler explains the process for accessing and communicating a tsunami hazard.


Abby Wutzler, from Wellington New
Zealand, was vacationing in Samoa
on September 29, 2009 when she
noticed the ocean was withdrawing.
She had also been taught about the
natural warning signs of a tsunami
in school and ran up and down the
beach yelling that a tsunami was
coming.  Many tourists credit Abby’s warning with
saving their lives.


Moisés Molina was on duty in the Chilean
coastal resort town of Iloca when the ground
started shaking in the early morning hours of
February 27, 2011. He was not from the
coast but he had seen the tsunami
evacuation signs posted in the town and
when he saw the ocean change character,
he realized it was time to evacuate. He
coordinated his police staff and successfully
notified everyone, including unsuspecting
campers, to evacuate. Thanks to his efforts,
no one in Iloca died.


Dr. Lori Dengler takes on the mistaken term "tidal wave" when referring to a tsunami.


In the early morning hours of February 27, 2010, Martina Marturana felt a slight tremor that lasted a long time.  The 12-year-old lived on Robinson Crusoe Island, 325 miles off the coast of central Chile. She looked out the window and noticed the boats in the harbor moving in an unusual way, and ran to ring an alarm bell in the town square. Eight people died in her village but she is credited with saving over 600!


Geologist Lori Dengler says a Tsunami Communications Test is coming. 

On the morning of March 28th, folks will encounter alert tones, texts and other messages announcing the test. This is a preparedness effort for a tsunami coming from afar.

To learn about receiving emergency alert notifications, click here.


BBC

On December 26, 2004, Tilly Smith was on vacation in Thailand with her family. Thanks to her school lessons, Tilly helped save many lives by recognizing the signs of an oncoming tsunami.


Katada Lab

Kamaishi junior high students saved themselves and many others during the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Geologist Lori Dengler highlights the students and preparedness drills that saved many lives.


FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has been very busy this year. Lori Dengler discusses disaster declarations and some of the financial considerations for recovery following a catastrophic event.


Mexico was the first country in the world to develop and implement an earthquake early warning system.

Within seconds of the recent 8.1 quake in southern Mexico, the temblor's location and magnitude were calculated and alerts were sent to neighboring communities.  Geologist Lori Dengler talks about the importance of this effective early warning system.


The goal of an evacuation is to get people out of harm's way...

It's hard to leave the comfort of our homes in an emergency. But when the call to evacuate comes, what will you do? Geologist Lori Dengler encourages heeding evacuation notices.


HSU Geology Dept.

Big wave surfers are in a class of their own. But Geologist Lori Dengler encourages sticking with giant waves generated by big storms. On this segment of Shaky Ground, Lori shares some of the science behind the nature of the utterly unrideable tsunami.