Courtesy Sharon Fennell

Sista Soul Looks Back

Since 1980, Sharon Fennell, better known as Sista Soul, has broadcast her Bronx sensibilities over KHSU's airwaves and through prison walls. Her final show airs Sunday, Dec. 18.
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A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck about 100 miles off the Northern California coast on Thursday morning, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said the earthquake, originally reported to have a magnitude of 6.8, wasn't powerful enough to generate a destructive tsunami. No damage or injuries were reported.

NOAA

Initially reported as a 6.8M quake, USGS has revised the strength downward to a 6.5. It was centered offshore, about 100 miles west of Ferndale at a depth of 6.8 miles underground.

KHSU Facebook followers as far north as Crescent City have reported feeling the temblor.

No tsunami warning as of 7:31 am. 

HSU

HSU President Lisa Rossbacher discusses the positive impact university faculty have on the lives of students - and reflects on her own college experience and the professor that helped shape the course of her career.


Thursday Night Talk: At Standing Rock

20 hours ago
Konrad Fisher

As the Dakota Access Pipeline conflict continues to heat up in the cold of pending winter Eric Kirk discusses the issues of petroleum, water safety, indigenous rights and sovereignty, and the very right to protest. Eric's guests include Konrad Fisher of Klamath Riverkeeper who has just returned from Standing Rock. Tune in and call in December 8 beginning at 7:00.

Sista Soul Looks Back

20 hours ago
Courtesy Sharon Fennell

Since 1980, Sharon Fennell, better known as Sista Soul, has broadcast her Bronx sensibilities over KHSU's airwaves and through prison walls. Her final show airs Sunday, Dec. 18.


[Youtube]

One of the world’s most popular musical instruments is not always the most environmentally friendly.

Guitars are made from some of the rarest woods on Earth, and they grow in parts of the world hit hard by deforestation. So some U.S. guitar makers are starting to look elsewhere for their wood supplies. And one day, they hope to shop in the Pacific Northwest.

BillAyers.com

"I grew up in enormous privelege," activist Bill Ayers tells KHSU's Danielle Orr.  "I found myself awakening to a world in flames, a world out of balance, and I knew I wanted to be part of the solution." 

The noted dissident will talk about his new book, Demand the Impossible! A Radical Manifesto at Northtown Books on Friday

In light of recent elections, Dr. Rossbacher reflects on the impact federal funds have on numerous programs and initiatives at Humboldt State University - including the benefits of federal funding to student grants and financial aid.

  https://soundcloud.com/campusconnections

Trinidad painter Kathrin Burleson joins Wendy Butler to talk about The Creation Series, her watercolor exhibit.

Inspired by the book of Genesis, she says ancient texts are often "pulling on archetypes. So often, those things touch us in a way that's almost irrational."


The Army Corps of Engineers has denied a permit for the construction of a key section of the Dakota Access Pipeline, granting a major victory to protesters who have been demonstrating for months.

The decision essentially halts the construction on the 1,172-mile oil pipeline just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Thousands of demonstrators from across the country had flocked to North Dakota in protest.

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From NPR

President-elect Donald Trump's latest Twitter target is a local union official who questioned the billionaire's account of how many jobs he saved at a Carrier plant in Indianapolis.

Trump has previously used social media to browbeat companies that move jobs offshore as well as entertainers whose acts he finds tiresome.

On Wednesday, Trump took aim at Chuck Jones, president of the United Steelworkers Local 1999.

Trump wrote on Twitter that Jones "has done a terrible job representing workers. No wonder companies flee country!"

The surprise find of smallpox DNA in a child mummy from the 17th century could help scientists start to trace the mysterious history of this notorious virus.

Smallpox currently only exists in secure freezers, after a global vaccination campaign eradicated the virus in the late 1970s. But much about this killer remains unknown, including its origins.

In 2015, Lida Xing was visiting a market in northern Myanmar when a salesman brought out a piece of amber about the size of a pink rubber eraser. Inside, he could see a couple of ancient ants and a fuzzy brown tuft that the salesman said was a plant.

As soon as Xing saw it, he knew it wasn't a plant. It was the delicate, feathered tail of a tiny dinosaur.

Giraffes are dying at an alarming rate and could face extinction if the trend doesn't reverse, according to a new conservation report on animal populations worldwide.

The report was released by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, which maintains the so-called Red List of species threatened with extinction.

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