Cutcha Risling Baldy on the Power of The Flower Dance

Dr. Cutcha Risling Baldy is a writer, blogger and educator. Dr. Risling Baldy is Hupa, Yurok and Karuk and an enrolled member of the Hoopa Valley Tribe in Northern California. She is a professor of Native American Studies at Humboldt State. Dr. Risling Baldy's first book, We Are Dancing For You: Native Feminisms and the Revitalization of Women's Coming-Of-Age Ceremonies

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In the immediate aftermath of the Brussels bombings, Donald Trump mentioned something he likes to talk about — polls.

"Well first of all, this is a subject that is very near and dear to my heart, because I've been talking about it, certainly much more than anybody else, and it's why I'm probably No. 1 in the polls, because of the fact that I say we have to have strong borders," Trump said Tuesday morning on NBC's Today show.

After Tuesday's deadly attacks in Brussels killed more than two dozen people, we're seeing an outpouring of grief and support from around the world.

Like we saw after the November attacks in Paris, many took to social media to express their condolences and solidarity with the people affected — and latched onto prominent symbols associated with the country.

After the violence in Paris, renditions of the Eiffel Tower and the French flag were widely shared.

  Humboldt County’s all-American, singing, songwriting, ukelele goddess Josephine Johnson has just a minute to talk before she has to hit the road again. Fresh off her latest West Coast tour, Johnson comes to TTEOW bearing soulful, lyric-driven songs from her recent CD “Let It All Out,” and stories from the road, the ups, downs, and WTF’s of life as a single, female musician traveling alone. 

Sometimes the answer to a health mystery lies in a swig of booze.

In Bangladesh in recent years, there have been repeated mini-outbreaks of a disease called Nipah virus – three people here, four there.

Some people develop no symptoms. But in others, the virus can progress from a fever to fatal brain inflammation within a week.

A few years ago, epidemiologists figured out that people were likely getting Nipah from drinking raw date palm sap, a sweet drink popular in the winter, when the sap is easy to tap from trees pierced with a spigot.

The terrorist attacks in Brussels mark the third major assault in the heart of Europe in just over a year and raise a troubling question: Are European states prepared to deal with a sustained onslaught?

The satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo was hit in January 2015. Terrorists rampaged through Paris again in November. And now, Brussels has suffered bomb attacks at the airport and the subway, claiming more than 30 lives.

White House hopefuls are heading West on Tuesday as both parties face voters in Arizona and Utah, while Democrats will caucus in Idaho.

For Republicans, it's another chance to try to stop Donald Trump's mounting delegate advantage, and the states voting Tuesday aren't necessarily the friendly terrain he has been used to.

What is safe drinking water? Is it water that's clear? Smells clean? Tastes good? Comes from a trusted source, like a well or a pipe?

Those factors don't matter if the water is contaminated by tiny microbes or parasites invisible to the human eye.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told doctors they should really, really think twice before prescribing opioids for chronic pain.

And now the doctors are telling us that meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy often work better than pain meds and other medical treatments for chronic back pain.

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CTE has been part of the national lexicon in the U.S. since the 2015 movie Concussion dramatized the discovery of this degenerative brain disease among football players. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is found among people who’ve had head injuries.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

FBI Director Christopher Wray said Wednesday that he stands by the U.S. intelligence agencies' assessment that Russia interfered in the 2016 election, and he warned that the Kremlin has not stopped trying to undermine American democracy.

"My view has not changed, which is that Russia attempted to interfere with the last election and that it continues to engage in malign influence operations to this day," Wray said. "It's a threat that we need to take extremely seriously and respond to with fierce determination and focus."

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

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