Jessica Eden

Producer, Program and Operations Coordinator

jessica.eden@humboldt.edu

Jessica Eden is a producer and photographer who loves public radio and the talented volunteers that make KHSU such a great community station. In addition to her work with KHSU, she has produced content for public media in Alaska, the Pacific Islands, and Australian public broadcasting. Jessica has worked as a field biologist in rural regions of Alaska, the Caribbean and Pacific Islands. Her time on the airwaves on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, as the "seabird lady" and "fish guts lady", was the most memorable and enjoyable radio ever.  Jessica received her M.A. in Environment and Community studies, with a focus on Environmental Radio - exploring the confluence of people and place.

This week's Charlando Con La Raza features interviews with an HSU journalism student and Humboldt Baykeeper's Latino Outreach coordinator. Through their distinct disciplines, Jose Herrera and Jasmin Segura talk about passion for community work.


On this week's Food For Thought, Bruce Kaye joins Jennifer Bell to talk about his Hopi and Navajo roots and traditional foods from the region.


Xochitl, Brenda and Yojana discuss issues of justice and race locally and around the country.

How do we create positive change in our institutions and on the streets?

In a supremely difficult and divisive political landscape, how do we ensure justice and safety in our communities?

This week's Charlando Con La Raza takes on these challenging questions.


This installment of Charlando highlights the work of Cesar Chavez and discussion about the experience of  "culture" in the United States. Yojana and Brenda talk about expectations and surprises in their experiences living and studying here in the U.S.


On this episode of Food For Thought, Jennifer Bell continues her discussion with Kate Brown from Cultured Life Food.

They discuss making gomasio using locally sourced salt and quinoa flour sourced from locally grown grain.


NOAA

How will we know a tsunami may be coming?

Other than feeling the ground shake, we rely on tsunami warning centers to alert us about potential risk.  Dr. Lori Dengler explains the process for accessing and communicating a tsunami hazard.


When an earthquake happens, responding appropriately and efficiently will save lives. 


Abby Wutzler, from Wellington New
Zealand, was vacationing in Samoa
on September 29, 2009 when she
noticed the ocean was withdrawing.
She had also been taught about the
natural warning signs of a tsunami
in school and ran up and down the
beach yelling that a tsunami was
coming.  Many tourists credit Abby’s warning with
saving their lives.


Moisés Molina was on duty in the Chilean
coastal resort town of Iloca when the ground
started shaking in the early morning hours of
February 27, 2011. He was not from the
coast but he had seen the tsunami
evacuation signs posted in the town and
when he saw the ocean change character,
he realized it was time to evacuate. He
coordinated his police staff and successfully
notified everyone, including unsuspecting
campers, to evacuate. Thanks to his efforts,
no one in Iloca died.


Dr. Lori Dengler takes on the mistaken term "tidal wave" when referring to a tsunami.


Dr. Lori Dengler gives us a primer for the science of tectonics.


Aveao Faausu Fonoti, Mayor of Amanave, shows the bullhorn he used on the morning of September 29, 2009 to notify the residents of his village in American Samoa. He had attended a workshop sponsored by the
Samoan Affairs Office for mayors about
tsunamis only a few weeks beforehand and
remembered that ground shaking was a
natural warning. He ran through the village
blowing the bullhorn and alerting residents
to the danger. Although 80% of
the buildings in his village were destroyed,
no one died and no one was seriously injured.


Jessica Eden

Brenda Perez and Yojana Miraya discuss issues of identity, community and the power of artistic expression.

From gathering signatures for a local sanctuary law to experiencing the North Coast Repertory Theatre's performance of The Tenth Muse, Brenda and Yojana explore local efforts to strengthen community.

Charlando Con La Raza: Tuesday at 7pm, Wednesday at 7am,  Saturday at 1pm on RADIO BILINGUE.

The season is upon us!

On this segment of Sound Ecology, Carol Vandemeer encourages us to get out on the trail for encounters with blooming trillium.


Sound Ecology: Ospreys

Mar 19, 2018
Ken Lee / National Wildlife Federation

Ospreys are the world’s most widespread raptor, found near water everywhere except Antarctica.

Naturalist Ken Burton shares a bit about the life history of this special bird.


Jennifer Bell

On this week's Food For Thought, Kate Brown from Cultured Life Food joins Jennifer Bell for a discussion about utilizing healthy Humboldt and Del Norte butter for nutritious ghee.


Here's A Story: Cutcha

Mar 16, 2018

Indigeneity, sovereignty and American mythology: Cutcha shares a story.


Here's A Story: Carrie

Mar 16, 2018
Jessica Eden

Identity, sense of place, community. 

 Recovering heritage: Carrie shares a story.

Jose Herrera

The Charlando crew discusses supporting families and individuals through relationships and community organizing - and working to address social, economic, and environmental injustice in our region.

Brenda Urueta from True North joined Xochitl Cabrera, Brenda Perez and Yojana Miraya to unpack nuances of current immigration policy and highlight International Women's Day.

Entrevista - Brenda Urueta:

Full show:


HSU Masters student, Yojana Miraya joins Jennifer Bell to share a bit about growing up with quinoa as a community staple in the Andes of Peru.


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