EcoNews Report

Thursdays 1:30PM-2PM

Timely interviews on environmental issues that matter most on the North Coast and our bioregion, along with news and information on upcoming meetings, hikes and events. The EcoNews Report features a rotating cast of representatives from local environmental groups. 

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Regular hosts include: 

  • Jennifer Kalt - Humboldt Baykeeper
  • Scott Greacen - Friends of the Eel River
  • Larry Glass & Bella Waters - Northcoast Environmental Center
  • Tom Wheeler - Environmental Protection Information Center
  • George Ziminsky - Friends of the Arcata Marsh

The EcoNews Report has aired on KHSU for over 35 years - the longest running public affairs show on the station. Engineered by Fred McLaughlin. 

Jennifer Kalt / Humboldt Baykeeper

Aldaron Laird is a local environmental planner who has spent years thinking about how best to prepare the Humboldt Bay area for flooding, erosion, and higher groundwater levels that are projected in the next several decades as sea level rises. On August 7, he will lead a public workshop focusing on King Salmon and Fields Landing, which will be among the first local communities to face the effects of rising sea level.  

Salmon People in an Era of Ecological Colonialism

Jul 5, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

“When we call ourselves salmon people, that’s very literal in our purpose to take care of salmon. So that means the river and the forest, and all of these other things that create salmon habitat. So if the salmon aren’t here, I think that’s a very cosmological violence – like striping identity, striping purpose.”

Scott Greacen, Conservation Director for Friends of the Eel River is joined by Kaitlin Reed, Yurok Tribal member and PhD candidate in Native American Studies at UC Davis. Katilin is studying Native American land and water rights, traditional ecological knowledge, and environmental conflict. Her dissertation research explores the impacts of marijuana cultivation on Yurok Tribal lands with a focus on tribal sovereignty and environmental justice.

Northcoast Environmental Center

  13 Environmental stories in 30 minutes - that's the EcoNews Roundup!

On today’s EcoNews Report Roundup Larry Glass, NEC's Executive Director, and Bella Waters, NEC's Admin & Development Director, cover the following news stories:

Brian Carter

Joe Tyburczy is a marine ecologist with the California Sea Grant Extension who is studying the effects of eelgrass on ocean acidification. Joe and his colleagues are examining eelgrass’s role in reversing the effects of ocean acidification, which disrupts the ability to form shells in juvenile oysters and other marine life. 


Colin Fiske

What does it mean to design a public space for people over cars? Colin Fiske of the Coalition for Responsible Transportation Priorities discusses the key principles of transportation planning and how the Arcata Plaza could be redesigned to encourage safe and fun use.

For more on this subject and to read the Coalition's proposal for the plaza, visit transportationpriorities.org


Friends of the Eel River

“The key piece of this whole scheme, is that you get out from under the requirement to provide fish passage over Scott dam”

Tom Wheeler, Executive Director of the Environmental Protection Information Center, hosts a discussion with Friends of the Eel River Conservation Director Scott Greacen about Humboldt County’s position on the Eel River dams and concerns about transparency in local government. 

Local Author Sharon Levy Discusses the Arcata Marsh

May 31, 2018
CC Flickr Terrence McNally

George Zaminsky, Friends of the Arcata Marshinterview local science author Sharon Levy on her newly released book "The Marsh Builders: The Fight for Clean Water, Wetlands, and Wildlife”, which centers around the story of how citizens in 1970s Arcata fought for an alternative way to treat sewage that has inspired treatment wetlands worldwide.

Who are the Board of Supervisors?

May 24, 2018
Anne Maher / The Northcoast Environmental Center

Elections are coming up June 5, and that means it is time once again to vote for local measures and candidates, including the Board of Supervisors. For this EcoNews Report the Northcoast Environmental Center’s Anne Maher speaks to Mark Lovelace, former 3rd District Humboldt County Supervisor, about the roles and responsibilities the Board of Supervisors has, especially in regards to environmental work. Afterwards, hear the NEC’s questions to the candidates (and their responses) at the May 10 Humboldt County Supervisors Forum.

Alex Milan Tracy

Pete Nichols talks to Waterkeeper Alliance Senior Organizer Lesley Adams about a fracked gas pipeline that would trample farms, ranches, and tribal lands to reach a proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal in Coos Bay, Oregon. The proposed 229-mile pipeline would impact more than 400 waterways, including the Rogue, Umpqua, and Klamath Rivers. The LNG terminal would be one of the largest climate polluters in the state. 


Victory in Court for Klamath Salmon

May 3, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

"Rivers carry more than just water – they also carry sediment which is very important to a river’s function and its ability to naturally regulate itself from diseases."

The NO-GO Road 30 Years Later

Apr 26, 2018
Native American Studies Graduate Student Symposium

This April marked the 30th anniversary of the GO Road. A road originally scheduled to run from Gasquet to Orleans (hence the name G-O) in order to permit timber harvesting and other resource extraction in the Six Rivers National Forest, it would have run through high country land sacred to members from the Karuk, Tolowa, and Yurok tribes. The story of the road and why it was never finished is has become infamous. 

Godwit Days Festival is this weekend!

Apr 19, 2018
Courtesy of Godwit Days

Godwit Days is an annual festival celebrating spring bird migration in and around Humboldt Bay, an important stop on the Pacific Flyway for thousands of shorebirds, waterfowl, hawks, owls, songbirds. My guest is Godwit Days Media Liaison, Sue Leskiw.


Pacific Gas and Electric Co.

Stephanie Tidwell, Friends of the Eel River Executive Director, and Scott Greacen, Friends of the Eel River Conservation Director, discuss new and proposed state legislation and how it may effect the Eel River.

California legislators passed SB 92 and AB 1270, both of which provide greater oversight of California dams. AB 1270 requires annual inspections of high hazard dams - those were loss of life is likely in the event of dam failure, and even makes some information from inspections part of the public record. If these new procedures raise red flags about the safety of Scott Dam on the Eel River, we will know the system is on the right track.

Stephanie and Scott also discuss Friends of the Eel River's cautious optimism for Mike McGuire's proposed Great Redwood Trail Act, SB 1029. This bill seeks to resolve the longstanding issues with the Northcoast Railroad Authority and failed NW Pacific rail line, and to expand trail and recreational opportunities for the region. Tune in to hear about Friends of the Eel River's vision for the future of the Eel River Canyon.


Craig Strong

"The reason we count murrelets at sea is, of course, because in the forest they are flying around at really high speeds in the dawn or dusk and while you can see them and hear them there is no way you can get a handle on their populations", says Craig Strong of Crescent Coastal Research.

Ken Burton, wildlife biologist, vice president of the Redwood Region Audubon Society, Friends of the Arcata Marsh docent, and author, interviews Strong on the status of Marbled Murrelets on the north coast and his murrelet monitoring program.


John Abela, Flickr CC.

Titlow Hill has been the location of illegal and unpermitted activities for decades. From building roads to sub-dividing and selling parcels, the development in this area poses major risks to its environment, wildlife, and people. The site is about twelve miles west of Willow Creek and bounded by Highway 299, Titlow Hill Road/US Route 1, and upper Redwood Creek.


Is It Safe To Eat Fish from Humboldt Bay?

Mar 15, 2018
Jennifer Kalt / Humboldt Baykeeper

Have you wondered whether it is safe to eat fish from Humboldt Bay? Humboldt Baykeeper has been testing mercury levels in local fish with today’s guest, fisheries consultant Ross Taylor.

How Can We Make the Redwoods More Inclusive?

Mar 8, 2018
Ruby Rodriguez / Latino Outdoors

Close your eyes and think of an "environmentalist." What do you see? If its an old white guy (probably with a beard and a walking stick), you are not alone! Environmentalism has a diversity problem. It's not that people of color don't care about the environment—polls show that they do, and at levels that surpass white people—but the environmental movement has not made space for their inclusion.

Scott Dam
Rob Badger / Friends of the Eel River

Tune in for a discussion of the fate of the Eel River dams that highlights more questions than answers.

Pacific Gas and Electric made headlines last week when they announced, during the Eel Russian River Commission (ERRC) meeting, their intention to sell or surrender the Eel River dams. The Commission then began a discussion of how to expand their charter to meet the requirements of obtaining and running the Eel River dams, without admitting any intention to actually acquire the dams. They told the public they have a plan, but won't tell us what it is for.

Friends of the Eel River Executive Director Stephanie Tidwell and Conservation Director Scott Greacen question what is really going on, and why Humboldt County representatives like Estelle Fennell appear to be acting against the public's best interest.


Untrakdrover via Wikimedia Commons

Will Humboldt be the site of the West Coast’s first offshore wind energy project? 

Jesse Palmer / Flickr

Mercer-Fraser, an engineering company based out of Eureka, is proposing the construction of a 5,000-square-foot cannabis manufacturing facility at their property on the Mad River near Glendale. The site is immediately upstream from Humboldt Bay Municipal Water District’s intake wells, which provide drinking water for 88,000 residents of Humboldt County. If the project is approved, drinking water for 2/3 of Humboldt County’s residents could be impaired.

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