My Favorite Lecture

Special programming

My Favorite Lecture is an educational lecture series in which Humboldt State educators share some of their favorite material  with a live community audience in downtown Arcata, California. No topic is too big or small. 

My Favorite Lecture is a collaboration with Arcata Main Street with support from Plaza Grill. 

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"Behavior is difficult to measure directly because we have to rely on what you tell us. You get upset when we try to watch you,” says Humboldt State's Melinda Meyers.

And when researchers base their gender studies using questionable assumptions, as you’re about to learn, that research gets a little dodgy. 

 

In this lecture, Myers lays out a fun-but-firm critique of sexuality research, and makes clear why it matters. 

KHSU

What are we getting right when it comes to the science of climate change? What are we getting wrong? In this episode of My Favorite Lecture, Dr. Rich Boone takes you on a fact-based jaunt through one of today's most pressing issues. 

Why would invaders bother sacking a museum? Where's the value in plundering art?

Explore the idea of art looting and destruction over time, and understand the significance of such assaults against culture.  

[Advisory: Some of the content below maybe be considered graphic, bleak, and/or NSFW.]  

In this episode of My Favorite Lecture, Humboldt State history professor Ben Marschke paints a vivid picture of the spiritual, social, and economic factors that surrounded the witch hunts that led to an estimated 100,000 witch trials and 50,000 executions over hundreds of years. 

Demonology and epistemology collide as Marschke explores the "science" of witchcraft in the sixteenth century, placing witchcraft in the context of contemporary anxieties about gender, sexuality, and fertility.

 

You'll learn about popular handbook Malleus Maleficarum, which was basically the Oxford English Dictionary of how to spot, hunt, and try witches. 

KHSU

"If we look at what makes up the universe, it's a little disturbing," Humboldt State University physicist CD Hoyle told the standing-room-only audience in Arcata. "It turns that most of the universe is dark energy." And we don't know what that is. "And that's a problem." 

Physics has problems, and nature is hinting at mysteries as big as the universe itself.  There are contradictions among major models of nature that are, in Hoyle's opinion, downright embarrassing.

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