FORESTRY

Redwood Restoration Campaign Kicks Off

May 11, 2018
Save the Redoods League

Redwood National and State Parks are famous for their towering redwoods, but they are also in desperate need of a helping hand.

The loss of oak woodlands to native conifer encroachment is a major conservation concern in California, resulting in associated losses of wildlife habitat, traditional uses, biodiversity, and other ecosystem services. These concerns – compounded by development pressures, evolving understanding of fire’s role in California landscapes, and health threats like sudden oak death – have drawn increasing attention in recent years, and oak woodland conservation and restoration efforts have gained momentum.

Jim Furnish served as Deputy Chief US Forest Service from 1999-2002 after a stint as Siuslaw National Forest Supervisor from 1992-1999. Jim came by KHSU to talk about his memoir, "Toward a Natural Forest: The Forest Service in Transition" about the US Forest Service’s response to the Timber Wars in the 1990s and the video, "Seeing The Forest" about how the Siuslaw National Forest moved from a focus on the timber industry to  ecosystem management. 


Sanctuary Forest Program Directors, Tosha McKee and Galen Daugherty discuss their Van Arken Watershed Conservation Project and the plans for purchasing the Van Arken watershed, the third largest tributary to the Mattole headwaters. The public is also invited to an Exploring the Sanctuary Forest Hike in the Van Arken watershed this Sunday morning, July 9 at 10 a.m.

  

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Log photo: Sam Howzit (CC 2.0 SA)

Forestry is one of the North Coast's most emblematic industries. But what do modern foresters do, and how does it affect this community? On this Thursday Night Talk, it's a silviculture special.


[Youtube]

One of the world’s most popular musical instruments is not always the most environmentally friendly.

Guitars are made from some of the rarest woods on Earth, and they grow in parts of the world hit hard by deforestation. So some U.S. guitar makers are starting to look elsewhere for their wood supplies. And one day, they hope to shop in the Pacific Northwest.