NATIVE AMERICAN

Marlon Sherman discusses topics from treaty law, Tribal law and his philosophy of Cooperative Autonomy.  

Marlon Sherman is a Professor & Department Chair in the HSU Native American Studies Department, specializing in indigenous and tribal law, justice, peacemaking, governance, environment, resource use, culture, history and philosophy.

Lyn Risling

“It’s a real mix of linguists and community activists, scholars and academics and community folks coming together to talk about issues that are important to us," explains Paula Tripp-Allen with the Native American Center For Academic Excellence (ITEPP). The California Indian Conference and California Big Time & Social Gathering takes place  in the HSU Forbes Complex on April 7th. 

Angel Schneider-Reuter, Zera Starchild

Five local women express their feelings, thoughts and experiences of facing racism daily in Humboldt County in this KHSU special feature. 


Here's A Story: Cutcha

Mar 16, 2018

Indigeneity, sovereignty and American mythology: Cutcha shares a story.


The Longest Walk to Save the Salmon

Nov 21, 2017

"Every step is a prayer. Every mile is a ceremony." Ray St. Clair called in from Santa Rosa during the Longest Walk to Save the Salmon. Ray and others started walking on November 1st in Seattle and will end with a gathering at Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay on the 23rd, for the annual un-thanksgiving day sunrise ceremony. 


As the U.S. prepares for Thanksgiving next week, many of us think of the image of happy 'Pilgrims and Indians' coming together for a big feast. But what about the rest of the story -- the historical facts versus the Mayflower myths?

This is a condensed version of a Thursday Night Talk program from November 16, 2017. 

Live Your Language Alliance

In many ways, language expresses worldview.

Leo Canez introduces us to the meaning and useage of 'Ayekwee' (Oyekwee) in the Yurok language.


The history of Native and Indigenous people in California is told through many lenses. According to Deborah Miranda—author of the book Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir, the stories of her people and many others who survived decades of persecution and genocide under colonialism, the gold rush and California missions, have not been told by enough native perspectives.


Thursday Night Talk: The Race Beat presents a special program in honor of  Humboldt State University's 24th Annual Indigenous Peoples' Week. The Indigenous Voices Forum offered a discussion about Christopher Columbus, the Doctrine of Discovery and Indigenous Peoples Rights. HSU professor, Cutcha Risling Baldy and KHSU's Lorna Bryant hosted the forum held in HSU's Kate Buchanan Room Wednesday, October 11, 2017.

Panelists included professors Marlon Sherman and Kayla Begay of Humboldt State's Native American Studies Department; Tia Oros Peters and Chris Peters of Seventh Generation Fund of Indigenous Peoples, Inc.; and Cynthia Boshell, former HSU lecturer. 

Click here for more information about Indigenous Peoples Week events.

Natalya Estrada

It started with burning of sage and several supporters gathering around the small Security National building on Eureka's fifth street. The building is owned by Rob Arkley, a local real estate tycoon who wanted to purchase a property known as Indian Island from Eureka instead of the city transferring it to the Wiyot Tribe. Within a few hours the crowd multiplied with nearly 100 protesters lining both sides of the street near the E Street intersection. 

HSU Multicultural Center

HSU's Campus Dialogue on Race presents Dr. Benjamin Madley  the author of "An American Genocide: The United State and the California Indian Catastrophe, 1846-1873" to speak about his book and the extensive research he conducted to bring readers the truth. You can attend the lecture Thursday from 11a.m.-1p.m. at the HSU Library Authors Hall.


Humboldt State University / https://www2.humboldt.edu/events/2016/10/11/5927/

Hupa-Yurok artist George Blake received an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters, conferred by the California State University and Humboldt State University, on October 11, 2016.  Blake creates his art using wood, silver, bones and antlers.  He is recognized as one of the few living people skilled in the traditional art of dugout canoe building. A Yurok dugout canoe created by Blake is on display in the HSU Library. Other works of  Blake have been on display at the Smithsonian.

Blake was honored by HSU for his many contributions  in the world of art. George Blake's art will be on display through December 3, 2016 at Humboldt State University’s Goudi’ni Native American Arts Gallery.

  Campus Connections on Soundcloud

"It was like feast and famine," distinguished artist George Blake (Hupa-Yurok) tells Wendy Butler on Artwaves. His early years weren't easy, but today Blake will receive an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters, to be conferred by the California State University and Humboldt State University.

Blake was nominated for his role in the resurgence of Native California traditional cultural life since the 1970s.

His work has been exhibited widely nationally and internationally and is in the collections of major institutions, like the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum at UC Berkeley. 

Food For Thought

Jennifer Bell continues her discussion on the sustainable harvest of local berries for delicious preserves with Lee Ann Moore and her father, Don Duclo from Oceanside Jams.

    https://myfoodforthought.wordpress.com/

Food For Thought

Jennifer Bell is joined by Lee Ann Moore and her father, Don Duclo, from Oceanside Jams  for a discussion on the sustainable harvest of local berries for delicious preserves.

https://myfoodforthought.wordpress.com/